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Adoption and Parenting Reads of the Week

Happy Saturday, friends! How are you doing today?

We’re excited to embrace the weekend with our family, and to begin preparing for Thanksgiving. Can you believe it’s just around the corner?

Enjoy a moment of calm with a few of our favorite adoption and parenting reads of the week, celebrating National Adoption Month topics and so much more.

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The holidays are coming up, and we love this list of ten gifts for kids that aren’t toys. The metal detector and headlamp are genius!

It’s a hot topic these days. At which age should your child get a cell phone? “Caretakers should keep in mind, though, that giving a phone to kids who are not emotionally or developmentally ready can create many challenges. Murphy suggested coming up with a family media plan or agreement (Common Sense offers them). Although a contract can seem “cheesy,” she said, it’s a helpful way for parents to establish any ground rules and how they expect their kids to behave with their phone online and off.”

The problem with saying you’ll adopt after you have biological kids.

Why are all the mom books written by white women?

The foster care battles I didn’t fight.

A beautiful story about an adoptive father’s journey to build a relationship with his childrens’ birth mothers.

Michelle Obama recently opened up about her own miscarriage. “…Obama said she felt like she ‘failed because I didn’t know how common miscarriages were because we don’t talk about them. We sit in our own pain, thinking that somehow we’re broken … I think it’s important to talk to young mothers about the fact that miscarriages happen.’”

The American Academy of Pediatrics says spanking is no good. “Effective discipline involves practicing empathy and ‘understanding how to treat your child in different stages in development to teach them how to cool down when things do get explosive,’ said Dr. Vincent J. Palusci, a child abuse pediatrician at Hassenfeld Children’s Hospital at N.Y.U. Langone.”

Should childhood trauma be treated as a public health crisis?